Chairman must resist winds of change

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If football chairman and fans alike ever needed a reason to pledge faith in their underfire manager, Wolverhampton Wanderers' hopeless search for a replacement for sacked boss Mick McCarthy has built a case so strong, even Atticus Finch would shirk at the prospect of leading a defence.

The midland outfit have approached no fewer that seven managers in relation to the vacant position, only to appoint assistant manager Terry Connor, who while being a talented coach, is unlikely to possess the tools required to drag a Wolves team, who have been out of the bottom three just once since mid-January, to safety.

Coaches may have a wealth of knowledge concerning the intricacies of the game, but the missing component of managerial nouse during a relegation run in could be vital. It begs the question what chairman Steve Morgan and chief executive Jez Moxey were thinking when they parted with a manager ready-made for the task at hand.

Granted, they were never going to sound out a potential target prior to parting with McCarthy, but their scatter-gun approach provides evidence, not only of the unrealistic expectations laid at the door of a new face, but of the error of their ways.

It may be too late for Morgan and Moxey, whose naive management has seriously jeopardised Wolves' Premier League status, but for the rest of football's henchman, their struggles should act as a warning.

After two successive seasons languishing at the wrong end of the table, the pair obviously feel the club have the divine right, perhaps due to the club's new £18 million stand or the £25 million paid out in transfer fees during the past two summers, to be seeking the safety of mid-table.

The thoughts mirror those of Huddersfield Town, who sacked manager Lee Clark last week. A club who have invested heavily in promotion from League One were on the wane according to chairman Dean Hoyle, and although only time will tell, have brought in a boss whose tried and tested at that level in ex-Leeds United boss Simon Grayson.

Financial investment should reflect expectation, but there is a sense of being careful of what you wish for, hence any supporter clamour for a managerial alteration should be attached with caution.

Therefore the faithful at Stamford Bridge and The Emirates Stadium, who are justifiably disappointed with current circumstances, should resist from demanding change so readily.

Neither Arsene Wenger, who during his 16-year tenure at Arsenal has earned the opportunity to turn the club's fortunes around, or Andre Villas-Boas, a boss whose long-term goals mean he's deserved a stay of execution under Roman Abramovich, can be easily replaced.

If chairman can't bring in a manager who won't significantly improve the team's fortunes without a major overhaul, then why not hand those resources to the current manager? The likes of Liverpool and Queens Park Rangers may be forced to answer that question come the end of the season.

Football chairman do appear to have heeded the warning, with only three managers in the Premier League having lost their jobs, with contract disputes and compensation potentially playing a big role, but in terms of progression on the pitch, not having faith is likely to be the biggest price they pay.

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