For each time a Premier League club has landed themselves a bargain, another has overspent on a mediocre player.

Here are a selection of some of the worst transfers in Premier League history:

Andy Carroll | Newcastle to Liverpool, £35m

With Spanish striker Fernando Torres departing Liverpool for Chelsea, the Reds used a significant amount of the funds to buy former Newcastle United striker Andy Carroll.

After Carroll impressed during his time at St James' Park, many fans thought that as the years progressed he would prove good value for the £35m that Liverpool splashed out for his services. However, after scoring only six goals in 47 Premier League appearances, many fans were disappointed and Carroll was the subject of bids from mid-table Premier League clubs. He is now enjoying a loan spell at West Ham.

Fernando Torres | Liverpool to Chelsea, £50m

The football world was shocked when wantaway Fernando Torres left Anfield for the Blues for a blinding £50m. The Spaniard marked his debut for Chelsea on in February 2011 and went goalless until mid-April.

Marking approximately 900 minutes without a goal, many fans laughed at the initial £50m Roman Abramovich spent.

The following season, Torres only scored 11 goals in 49 appearances which caused speculation about the striker possibly being offloaded. However, after scoring the crucial goal in the Champions League semi-final against Barcelona, some would say that the goal was worth £50m. For this reason, he should not be classed as the worst Premier League signing of all time.

David Bentley | Blackburn to Tottenham, £15m

The Peterborough-born midfielder joined Tottenham in the summer of 2008 for a whopping £15m after impressing at Blackburn Rovers. The former Arsenal player played for Spurs on numerous occasions in his first two seasons at the club, but never really showed that he was worth the money.

With a total of three goals in 42 appearances at Tottenham, Bentley has found himself lower in the pecking order than Aaron Lennon and has recently had a recent loan spell at Birmingham. Bentley is currently enjoying a loan spell at his former club, Blackburn.

Adrian Mutu | Parma to Chelsea, £16m

Adrian Mutu was an exciting prospect once he first joined Chelsea after establishing himself as an asset to the team for the first half of the 2003/04 season, but his performances turned stale during the second half of the season.

The original transfer became a laughing stock after he tested positive for cocaine and was sanctioned heavily by Chelsea. He was handed a seven month ban and fined heavily.

Juan Sebastian Veron | Lazio to Manchester United, £28m

Former Argentina midfielder Juan Sebastian Veron joined Old Trafford in a £28m switch that excited Manchester United fans. He was set high standards by both the manager and the fans, but never really lived up to them.

He had trouble adapting to the faster pace of the Premier League and was not allowed the same space and time on the ball as he was in Serie A. The former Lazio player gained a lot of publicity due to him being an expensive flop. He was later sold to Chelsea in a £15m switch.

Stewart Downing | Aston Villa to Liverpool, £20m

The English winger impressed greatly at Villa Park, linking well with Ashley Young, and ended up moving to Anfield for a cool £20m in the summer of 2011.

During his first season on Merseyside, he played 36 games without an assist or a goal, which led to a doubt over Downing's future at the club. Despite having improved for this season with three goals and three assists, it is unlikely that he will ever match the initial fee Liverpool bought him for.

 

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Topics:
#Stewart Downing
#Premier League
#Fernando Torres
#David Bentley
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