It's not a great feeling for either party when a manager is let go, but it's even worse for a club when they realise, in hindsight, they made the wrong decision.

Here are five of the worst sackings of the Premier League era:

1. Roberto Di Matteo | Chelsea (November 2012)

Perhaps the most infamous sacking decision ever: the man known affectionately by the fans as "Robbie", was sacked just six months after guiding the Blues to the FA Cup and a shock Champions League title, as the Blues became the first London club to win Europe's most prestigious cup competition.

He was let go by owner Roman Abramovich after a disappointing start to the 2012/13 season in both the league and Champions League - which they only qualified for after winning the preceding tournament - despite many objections from the fans.

To make things worse, he was replaced by Rafael Benitez, who was anything but a fans favourite and now, in every 16th minute of matches, Di Matteo is sung about passionately by the crowd.

2. Mick McCarthy | Wolves (February 2012)

When McCarthy was sacked by the Wolves board in 2012, they were lying 18th in the Premier League, only in the relegation zone on goal difference. By the end of that season, they had finished bottom, six points behind 19th place and 12 points from safety.

After he was sacked, Wolves turned to assistant coach Terry Connor, who had no experience of managing and struggled to win a game before the end of the season, only gaining four points from the 13 games after McCarthy's sacking.

This was also a strange decision as McCarthy was the man who had brought the Molineux side into the Premier League and kept them there, against all odds, for two seasons.

This was a blatant sign that the owners no longer have respect for mangers anymore, especially ones who put so much work and effort into the club like the former Ireland boss did.

3. Sam Allardyce | Blackburn Rovers (December 2010)

Big Sam was sacked by new owners, the Venkys, in December 2010, after a run of three losses in five games.

For a team fighting for survival, that is not even too bad and, when you consider he was replaced by the inexperienced Steve Kean, it doesn't look any better.

To make things even worse, if that's possible, when Allardyce was sacked, Blackburn were 13th in the league, but by the end of the season they finished 15th, while the next season resulted in relegation.

This sacking started the ongoing decline which has seen them fall from Premier League winners in 1995, to relegation candidates in the Championship.

4. Mark Hughes | Manchester City (December 2009)

Hughes, in my opinion, was treated very unfairly by Manchester City's rich owners. He was doing a fine job, but they were impatient for the results, and I feel if Hughes had stayed the title that eventually came last year, may have come even earlier.

When Hughes was sacked, City were lying sixth in the league, but had only lost twice all season, and were in the semi-finals of the League Cup. At the end of the season, after hiring Mancini, they had only managed to improve to fifth place, which probably would have happened even if Hughes still had his job.

They also failed to win a trophy that year, which was the target.

5. Chris Hughton | Newcastle United (December 2010)

Hughton was the unexpected saviour in Newcastle, reinstating them back into the top flight after only one year out of it; but although many thought he would get a full Premier League season to see what he could do at the top level, he was sacked just four months into the season when his side were in 11th.

He was sacked by the board because they wanted a more experienced manager who could lead the team forward; however, Alan Pardew had the opposite effect as they ended the season 12th, a place lower than the position the Magpies were in under Hughton, who enjoyed notable wins against rivals Sunderland and Aston Villa.

We have also seen later on that Hughton is a great manager, making Norwich punch way above their weight.

So these are my worst five sackings, but if you can think of any others, don't hesitate to comment below!

 

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#Football
#Premier League
#Roberto Di Matteo