We’ve all been culpable of shouting at the TV, criticising the latest pundit’s views on football’s hottest topics.

“You don’t know what you’re talking about!” we scream. Sometimes this is fair, other times we just get caught up in the frenzy of the game. However, some pundits regularly leave us scratching our heads asking just how they managed to secure a full-time job as a pundit.

Let’s take a look at the worst five.

1. Alan Shearer

Alan Shearer is undeniably one of the best players ever to grace the Premier League. Passion, power, drive and an eye for goal made him one of the hottest players in the game. However, since taking the step into football punditry he seems to have forgotten all of these characteristics in his shooting boots.

After somehow managing to become first choice on Match of the Day, Shearer often displays quite impressively dull, on-the-fence opinions that make Alan Hansen look like Captain Charisma. Shearer’s punditry low point must be a toss-up between describing Hatem Ben Arfa - capped by France, signed by Marseille for £10m - as an unknown when joining Newcastle, or presenting a piece on the South African apartheid during the 2010 World Cup.    

2. Adrian Chiles

West Brom fan Adrian Chiles has faced scathing criticisms from most corners of the football world since he assumed the position of ITV football’s top dog. Obviously having no previous playing experience, Chiles has been championed as having a fans' eye view on the game.

However, more often than not this leads to inaccurate and often pointless observations of the game that leaves his guests desperately trying to respond in the most democratic way possible. Maybe major football programmes should look beyond daytime TV for their next investment.

3. Graeme Souness

Where to start with Graeme Souness? Another good player turned awful pundit. Similarly to others on this list, Souness is a failed manager, having endured torrid spells at the likes of Newcastle United and Blackburn Rovers.

He often feels the need to produce dramatic sweeping statements, seemingly with being controversial the sole aim. This can be shown by his view prior to the Manchester United v Arsenal game on Sunday that Phil Jones has done “nothing” to convince him that he has a future for United. An interesting insight considering Jones is held in high regard by most football enthusiasts.

4. Roy Keane

Roy Keane’s punditry is almost as angry as his playing style. Several failed attempts at management with the likes of Ipswich Town and Sunderland showed that he clearly doesn’t have the temperament to lead a team to success without snarling at the opposition on the field, so he took the logical step and took to berating his fellow pundits instead.

The most hilarious incident of this type was his recent heated debate with Gareth Southgate about whether or not Nani should have been sent off against Real Madrid. Keane’s view that the red card was deserved may have seemed hypocritical to say the least, but the verbal onslaught he directed at Southgate nearly led the ex-England centre half to tears. Don’t worry Gareth, it would have scared most of us!

5. Ray Wilkins

For an interesting game, count how long it takes Ray Wilkins to bring ANY footballing topic back to Chelsea. Ask him about his views on the offside rule and I’m sure he could recount numerous instances in which his beloved Chelsea were denied goals unfairly.

Thankfully Wilkins is rarely seen, but it’s always a disappointing moment when his face graces the screen on a Saturday afternoon.

 

Write for GiveMeSport! Sign-up to the GMS Writing Academy here: http://bit.ly/12nAsNY

DISCLAIMER: This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeFootball Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeFootball.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeFootball.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

 

Topics:
#Football
#Alan Shearer