Cricket

Pietersen denies silicone tape allegations

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England might have retained the Ashes after a lucky draw in the third Test, but the series is far from over - and so are the controversies.

This year's Ashes would be long remembered for the various flaws it has exposed in the Decision Reversal System (DRS). Umpires have goofed up while analysing and Hot Spot technology - a main stay of Cricket - has shown numerous flaws.

The Daily Telegraph states that ICC GM, Geoff Allardice, arrived from Dubai on Wednesday morning and will meet senior representatives of both sides in the afternoon in an attempt to reassure them over DRS after a series of blunders in the Ashes.

Warren Brennan, the Australian inventor of Hot Spot, is thought to be preparing a statement in which he will blame the fibreglass coating on some bats for failure of some faint edges to show up on his system.

However, the newest allegation, and a very serious one, has now cropped up. As per Channel Nine of Australia, batsmen have been deliberately applying silicone tapes to their bat's edges so that Hot Spot misses detecting nicks.

Silicone, due to it's high heat resistance, would go undetected under thermal imaging of the Hot Spot, and thus, show no result. Batsmen are allowed to use tapes on their bat's edges, although this effect was thus far not considered.

England's Kevin Pietersen, the star of the drawn third Test, was quick to respond to the allegations and took to Twitter to express his anger.

"I am never afraid of getting out! If I nick it, I'll walk..

"To suggest I cheat by covering my bat with silicon infuriates me.

"Horrible journalism yet again! My name brought up in hotspot crisis suggesting I use silicon to prevent nicks showing! Such hurtful lies."

He also offered a very good reasoning, to counter the Silicone claim.

"How stupid would I be to try & hide a nick when it could save me on an LBW appeal, like in 1st innings where hotspot showed I nicked it."

A silicone taped bat would go undetected under an LBW referral, and in that case that batsmen would be at loss - and LBW's are much more likely to happen than edges.

Australian Captain Michael Clarker also rubbished the claims.

"It's hard for me to talk for other players, but I've never heard any type of conversation like that in the Australian change room.

"I didn't know there was such a thing you could do to hide nicking the ball on Hot Spot. I wouldn't have thought that a bit of tape would have made any difference anyway.

"I can't talk for everyone but if that's the case and we're talking about cheating, I can guarantee you there's not one person in the Australian change room who will cheat. It's not the way we play cricket."

The game of cricket has been under controversies for various technological gaffes and issues recently, but this one seems to be the biggest. Hopefully, the ICC can solve the crisis and continue the better use of technology to improve the game.

 

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Topics:
Kevin Pietersen
Australia cricket
Cricket
Michael Clarke
England cricket

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This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

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