Football

Real Madrid's Galactico regime should be scrapped

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The Galactico system doesn't guarantee results.  (©GettyImages)
The Galactico system doesn't guarantee results. (©GettyImages).

It's an annual event, Real Madrid completing a blockbuster signing.

Regardless of how the team has fared the year before, how much it's going to cost them or whether the manager is fully behind the transfer, the Spanish giants, whilst under Florentino Perez, will always recruit a big name signing before embarking on a new campaign.

It is a wonderful spectacle to behold, and I have no hesitation in saying that. Any team that could boast the likes of Figo, Zidane, Roberto Carlos, Ronaldo, David Beckham and Michael Owen in one squad was always going to be an attractive proposition. Likewise, Perez's second stint as president, which has heralded the arrivals of Cristiano Ronaldo and co. has been accompanied by a craze that was missing during the four years when Ramon Calderon was at the helm.

However, and I say this as a supporter of Madrid, the Galactico system is flawed at it's most fundamental level.

The rejection of bringing in a world-class player religiously every season on paper would be tantamount to madness, but in reality it is a regime that presents more problems than it does pros.

In the modern game it's almost impossible to reach the top without spending money, but breaking the bank almost annually is not a healthy routine to establish, and yet it's one that Madrid openly embrace.

Perez's presidential pledges are focused around the promise of bringing a footballing house-hold name to the Bernabeu once a year, and as far as commitment to the cause goes, Perez's approach has been unquestionable. But what exactly can Madrid say they have achieved for all the money they've spent?

Los Blancos pipped Barcelona to the title in 2011/2012 season, but it's the only time they've done so in the four years since Perez returned to his post.

The truth is, installing a new poster-boy every year disrupts the squad. In essence Madrid is derived of a team of egos all vying for the number spot, and it ultimately leaves a team bereft of unity or a common goal when stripped to the bare bones.

The current Bale to Madrid saga is a perfect example of how the Galactico policy is unsettling at the best of times. If Bale moves for the world record fee being banded about, it's not just Cristiano Ronaldo who will be left nose-out-of-joint.

Now consider the futures of Angel di Maria, Mesut Ozil and Karim Benzema. All three are unplayable on their day, and yet to hit their primes, one would anticipate they will be capable of great things in a few years time.

However the club seem set to be rid of the trio, in order to fund the move of Gareth Bale, who, when all things considered, could quite easily end up the biggest flop in history due to the unbelievable pressure of expectation he carries on his shoulders.

At Madrid, the Galactico regime offers merely a cut-throat means of relinquishing the values of team-work, solid foundations, and youth development. A player is only truly safe if his name is Ronaldo or there is no other world-class rival emerging in his position at another club.

It's terrible for dressing room harmony, extremely expensive for the club, and in the long-run isn't proven to be any more effective than any other method of transfer-window conduct.
For me, the Galactico ideals, though fantastic to envisage, do not become a club who wishes to thrive and prosper.

Build a team, stay true to your players and strengthen when you genuinely need to strengthen; that's how the general rule goes.

Unfortunately Perez's hands are now tied. If he fails to deliver big-name, big-money signings on the regular, he's guilty of breaching the very promises he made to gain presidency in the first place.

A sorry state of affairs indeed.

Topics:
La Liga
Real Madrid
Football
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