Money is becoming a bigger factor in football – so much so that it's becoming an issue for many.Not many of us can remember the days a league could be won by 10 different teams in pre-season, nor will we see it again. Why? Financial backing.

Let's take Monaco for example. Last season Monaco were playing in the second tier of French football and were vastly forgotten about by most around Europe.

They coup a major investment, gain promotion and buy arguably the best striker in the world - Falcao.

Not only can they afford his transfer fee, but can then proceed to give him over £250,000 in wages. These figures are astounding – even in these times.

Now Monaco sit joint top of Ligue 1 with fellow fat cats Paris Saint Germain. As long as these two clubs have this kind of money pumped into them, French football will become a two horse race for many years to come.

But money is a good thing right? Not always the case. Let's look at Anzhi. Nobody had heard of the Russian minnows until their oil rich owner decided to splash out on Samuel Eto'o & Roberto Carlos.

After which they enjoyed (minor) success, bringing in some more high profile names and qualifying for the Europa League.

This continued as recently as last season. Now, the money has dried up and investors have pulled out. Anzhi now find themselves lingering in the relegation places of the Russian league.

Is there any stability left at the club? Of course not. Luckily for them, they'll survive. They managed to offload their big earners just in time before the worst could happen, but it's the fans that are left to pick up the pieces.

Players will always chase money, however, this often is the problem with loyalty amongst modern footballers. This is why players such as Ryan Giggs and Javier Zanetti are so rare.

Clubs like Celtic can't hold on to their best players because the money in Scotland isn't there. Players would rather play for a club they don't really care about on a massive wage packet than play for the club they grew up supporting. This is far wrong, and as we look to the future, things can only get worse.

Clubs like Manchester United and Real Madrid are in major debt. Probably the world's two biggest football clubs in terms of fan-base – in danger of going bust.

This is of course very difficult to believe but it's a real possibility. There will come a time where the banks will not lend any more money, and investors can only account for so much.

What will the clubs do when they have billions to pay back and can't get as much in?

Clubs need to be well run and start to be self sufficient. Living within a club's means ensures stability, and prevents the demise of a football club. You only have to look at where Rangers and Portsmouth were five years ago as to where they are now to see the impact this can have. Who has suffered? The fans, of course.

The worst part is that there probably isn't an answer.

What can stop a chairman pumping money into the club he owns? Why should a club that earns their own money not be allowed to spend it?

Financial fair play can only answer for so much, but there is no doubting the gaps between clubs within a single league are widening.

Boring and predictable leagues will result in lower attendances, less coverage. Who would be left to pick up the pieces again? You guessed it, the fans.

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Football