It's takes an awful lot for me to question the methods and practises of Jose Mourinho.

The usually astute and masterfully prepared tactician is a sure-fire favourite to be bang on the money more often that not, and there's virtually nothing you can say about his track record that argues otherwise.

However I find it virtually impossible to accept that the Special One is honestly looking at bringing Wesley Sneijder from Galatasaray to Stamford Bridge, as it's being reported in various publications.

It was Lois van Gaal at first who publicly voiced claims that Mourinho and Chelsea were aiming at bringing the Dutch playmaker to Chelsea, and naturally the media bandwagon has picked up momentum as a result.

For me though, it's simply a transfer that bears no fruits. Not now and most certainly not in the future.

Mourinho has worked with Sneijder before at Inter Milan and enjoyed bags of success, but he cannot hope for that to be replicated in the Premier League, not at this point in the Dutchman's career.

At 29 Sneijder has simply left it too late to give himself the time and athletic ability needed to successfully adapt to the rigours of Premier League football, particularly at a time when it is possibly experiencing the most open title race in more than a decade.

That's not factoring into account that Chelsea's midfield is already overcome with players who are similar to the Galatasaray man. If anything the likes of Eden Hazard and Oscar are merely younger, fitter, more efficient and more suited versions; modern masters of the skills Sneijder was renown for in his prime.

The former Inter star's time to shine in England's top flight has escaped him, and although he may be in a period generally associated with an athletes peak, Chelsea can't hope for him to replicate the form that made him a world talent, and from an honest point of view, he's only realistically on the decline in terms of attributes.

There's a lesson to be learnt from the capture of Samuel Eto'o and it certainly isn't that bargain buys on has-been world-beaters pay dividends for hopeful title challengers.

Sneijder might be an ideal signing for a team in need of creative flair or an influential figure to boost morale like United, but the fact of the matter is that Mourinho stands to do nothing but further put at risk the harmony of his squad by adding yet another creative midfielder.

A good buy potentially, but for Chelsea? There's few I can think of that could be of less use.

Topics:
#Premier League
#Chelsea
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