Football

German football's future is in safe hands

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Germany's footballing resurgence has been phenomenal and plain for everybody to see.

After a 2002 World Cup campaign which largely relied on the brilliance of Oliver Kahn and Michael Ballack and a disastrous Euro 2004 campaign where they did not even reach the second round, the German FA, DFB, took matters into their own hands.

A huge investment into German youth academies and close work with the top teams in Germany meant that over the next decade they would experience an influx of world-class talent.

This talent has been very evident and has attracted the best teams in Europe.
After the World Cup in 2010, Sami Khedira and Mesut Ozil moved to Real Madrid, Lukas Podolski and Per Mertesacker secured a move to Arsenal and Manuel Neuer made the move to Bayern Munich - as did Mario Gotze in 2013.

Wingers Marco Reus and Andre Schurrle moved to Borussia Dortmund and Chelsea
respectively - two teams that contested the last two Champions League finals
against Bayern Munich.

German talent was so obvious that these players soon became prized possessions.

The world has been enthralled by Germany's new midfield magicians but there
is a position which is filled with even more promise for the future.

Germany have a group of goalkeepers of a quality countries, such as England, could only dream of. Not only are there so many, but they are all looking at incredibly bright futures.

The potential is overwhelming and it is evident why Germany find themselves in this very positive situation.

Goalkeepers in the Bundesliga are primarily home-grown. Whilst teams in the Premier League struggle to reach home-grown status, it is something that comes very easily to Bundesliga clubs.

Whilst 70% of players in the Premier League are foreign, only 45% of players plying their trade in Germany's top tier are not German.

The statistics become more extreme when you take a closer look at only the goalkeepers. Out of the 54 'keepers in the Bundesliga, 47 are German. Out of the 18 considered first choice, 15 are German with Wolfsburg's Benaglio (Switzerland), Hoffenheim's Casteels (Belgium) and Augsburg's Manninger
(Austria) the only exceptions.

Compare that to the Premier League and the contrast is shocking. Only 16 ‘keepers
in the league are English and only three of them (Hart, Ruddy and Foster) play
week-in-week-out. That being said, none of them are showing consistent form and
the future is certainly looking bleak.

These statistics say a lot but what makes it truly impressive is the quality of the German 'keepers mentioned above.

Neuer, Weidenfeller and Adler have shown their ability many times and their talent is appreciated throughout Europe, however, it is the up-and-coming goalkeepers such as Zieler, Ter Stegen and Leno that are going to set the world alight.

Even at such a young age they have full international caps, Champions League experience and years of being first choice for their respective teams in the Bundesliga.

The smaller clubs also boast very good young goalkeepers. Oliver Baumann may
have had a game to forget against HSV but made up for it with a man-of-the-match performance in the following week, Sven Ulreich has been Stuttgart’s number one for a number of years already and Thomas Kraft played a major role in Hertha Berlin’s promotion in 2013 as well as being considered one of the best shot-stoppers in the league.

Germany has a history of producing very good goalkeepers with Sepp Maier,
Oliver Kahn and Jens Lehmann to name a few. This is obviously a trend that is
continuing well into the 21st century. Germany coach Joachim Low can rest assured that he will never have a goalkeeping problem

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This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

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