Football

Tottenham using blood spinning - but is it a form of doping?

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Andre Villas-Boas has sparked the press into action once again, after it was confirmed that Tottenham used blood spinning, thought to be a doping method to some, on Vlad Chiriches. 

PRP, as the method is known for short, involves removing blood from the person before re-injecting it and has been used by Tiger Woods and Rafael Nadal to aid their their recovery from injury.

The method involves removing blood from the subject before spinning it in a centrifuge to separate the cells, platelets and serum, then re-injecting the mixture back into the subject. It is scientifically proved to help compression injuries heal more quickly, yet in the football industry it has prompted fears that it’s too similar to traditional blood doping, a practice that has been outlawed by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Although it now seems that Tottenham are using the process in order to help players like defender Vlad Chiriches in this case, whose swollen knee has been treated with the method as Spurs look to get him back to fitness for Sunday’s crucial match against Liverpool.

How can something be labelled doping when it does not add anything to the blood many ask? Although in the opinion of others it is doping, because the process of spinning the blood can be seen as providing unnatural benefits, which boost the red blood cell count after treatment has been undertaken.

To some it seems like doping, functions like doping, and benefits like doping, so is it doping? You’re taking something out of your body, treating it, then putting it back in better than it was when you took it out. It sure seems like doping to me. PRP is becoming a bigger thing in society as time goes on, and it's definitely one that’s raised the Premier League’s attention.

Next year, when the Premier League’s doctors meet for their annual conference, PRP is very likely to be top of the agenda, with the league set to decide how they deal with a process that may be too close to doping to tolerate.

Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy isn't illegal in professional sports, however it is highly unheard of in football and has already been stamped out in cycling. It is now something the Premier League could and should reconsider next year.

Do you think Tottenham should be allowed to administer this treatment? Comment below...

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Topics:
Premier League
Tottenham Hotspur
Football

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This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

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