Cycling

Cycling still has a long way to go to get clean

Frank Schlek: the returning doper (©GettyImages)
Frank Schlek: the returning doper (©GettyImages).

Bradley Wiggins has this week admitted that he has had to change the school which his children attend, after they were bullied about whether their Dad had doped.

This playground bullying is a result of the horrendous assault on sporting ethics by Lance Armstrong, and shows just how far cycling has still got to go to to become clean.

Every year, and almost every Grand Tour seems to involve riders being caught cheating, returning from bans or being witnesses to other professionals' scandalous backroom cheating. Just last month, one of Luxembourg's golden cycling brothers, Frank Schleck, made his return from a one year doping ban after failing a drugs test in the 2012 Tour de France.

The Tour Down Under, saw Frank and brother Andy set their sights on victory in France this summer. But would it be right if a man formerly found guilty on doping charges, is able to come back and win the biggest bike race in the world?

No.

Yes, he continues to claim his innocence, but surely being found guily suggests that the powers that be have enough evidence of cheating. Therefore he, and any other cheats, should not be allowed to return to the sport competitively.

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Topics:
Tour De France
Sir Bradley Wiggins
Cycling

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