Liverpool owner John W Henry revealed in a rather nonchalant and arrogant manner that he refused to honour a release clause in Luis Suarez's contract when Arsenal activated it last summer.

"He had a buy-out clause" said Henry at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference.

"I don't know what degree I should go into this - but he had a buy-out clause of £40million. So Arsenal, one of our prime rivals this year ... they offered £40million and one pound for him and triggered his buy-out clause."

It was rather shocking news for Arsenal fans to hear, especially as they had just seen their team go down 1-0 to Stoke with their strikers failing to create a single chance in the game.

'What ifs' were flying around the away end at the Britannia Stadium as Arsenal fans wondered what life would be like with the Premier League top goalscorer in their team.

After Arsenal triggered the release clause of Suarez it looked very much like he would move to the Emirates. The Uruguayan had stated his desire to play Champions League football and was ready to join Arsenal.

However, Liverpool rejected the bid and the matter was closed. Suarez now has a new mega contract at Anfield and recently stated that he'll be with Liverpool even if they fail to qualify for the Champions League.

But why, if Suarez had a release clause written in his contract, did he not take the matter out of Liverpool's hands and go to an arbitration? If he was truly determined to leave Anfield for Arsenal, would he not have attempted to leave via any means necessary even if that meant through an independent adjudication?

Rumours surfaced that Suarez was preparing for such a legal battle but it never materialised, but why didn't it?

One theory, conjured up in one's suspicious mind, is that Suarez never really wanted to join Arsenal and was always hoping a bigger club would come in for him once talks with the Gunners had started.

Throughout the summer various reports suggested that Suarez's dream move was to Real Madrid and it would not surprise many to find out that he wanted to coax them into a bid if the prospect of him joining another Champions League club ever became a viable prospect.

If such a clause did exist - we now know it did - he must have fancied his chances of winning in a court battle but chose not to apply that sort of pressure to Liverpool.

Despite his agitating and his frequent calls for the club to let him go to Arsenal, he never made the real effort to make sure the release clause was honoured.

One believes that if Barcelona, Bayern Munich or Real Madrid had made such an offer things would have turned out much different for Suarez and Liverpool. 

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