Alex Hales, match-winner for England in their T20 World Cup clash against Sri Lanka earlier today (Thursday), was collared for a Facebook 'selfie' by England number two Paul Collingwood in the aftermath of victory.

The Nottinghamshire opener struck an unbeaten century for his country in Bangladesh, propelling England back into contention in Group 1.

Chasing down 190 to win, Hales rebuilt the innings alongside Eoin Morgan after seeing his side fall to 0/2. He finished on 116 from 64 balls, whilst Ravi Bopara's cameo 11 at the death helped England to victory with four balls to spare.

Collingwood, who is working alongside Ashley Giles as part of the coaching team on the tour, knows a thing or two about winning big T20 internationals, having guided England to World glory as captain in 2010.

And, he was understandably thrilled with Hales' performance, admitting the 25-year-old can bat a bit - although needs some practice away from the crease and on the ping pong table.

"This guy can bat but he still needs a bit of practise at table tennis! Well done you Loon! #WT20 #AlexHales," he wrote alongside the photo on Facebook.

The assistant coach has been receiving some high-profile backing since taking the role, with another former captain - Michael Vaughan - backing 'Colly' to make an impact alongside Giles.

Improving morale and spirit was one of the key remits for the Durham-man, and this changing room photo with the man of the moment suggests the players are behind the veteran.

"People talk about him being the mascot for the side and just a fun character but that’s not fair. Paul has a fantastic cricket brain and a real nous for the game, and that’s exactly what this England side need," Vaughan told the MCC website at the start of the month.

"Paul came up with some great strategies as England captain when they won the World T20 four years ago."

Collingwood will hope to continue making a positive impact when England face South Africa in their next group game, on March 26th.

Topics:
T20 World Cup
Cricket
England cricket