World champion Sebastian Vettel has pulled back some of his criticism of the new V6 engines.

Earlier in the week, the German was blunt as he shared his thoughts on the new F1 soundtrack describing the noise as "s**t".

Though Red Bull backed Vettel over his coarse language it is now understood FIA President Jean Todt has warned the four-time champion.

Respected publications in Germany including sports daily Sport Bild are reported saying a personal letter was written by Todt to Vettel claiming he risked bringing the sport into disrepute with his comments.

Indeed as the sport tries to sell it's new look product to the world a description of the new sound such as that made by it's world champion go a long way in harming its chance of success.

Speaking to another German publication, Auto Bild, the 26-year-old stood by his comments.

"I stand by what I said -- I am a fan of the old F1," Vettel said.

The Red Bull driver did admit his choice of words had caused an "issue".

"I've always been of the opinion that if you have something to say, then say it. It would not be good if suddenly you start to pretend."

Though clearly not for the new regulations, he admitted he hadn't lost any joy in driving in F1.

"The fact that I criticise doesn't mean that I do not like Formula One anymore," he claimed.

"We are still here with the best cars in the world competing against the best drivers.

"At the moment it might not sound that great, but Formula One is still the pinnacle of motor sport," added Vettel.

And to those who argue he is simply against the new rules because they have ended his run of dominance he retorted: "I don't care."

What is clear, however, is the RB10 that looked so troublesome pre-season has improved and continues to do so at an incredible rate.

Most believe the car as a whole will be able to match the new dominant team by the Spanish Grand Prix later this month, however excluding the currently under-performing Renault engine, Nico Hulkenberg believes the new Red Bull is actually the best chassis on the grid.

Indeed last weekend in Malaysia and again on Friday in Bahrain, on the twistier parts of the circuit the Adrian Newey designed car is on a level with the leading Mercedes, however where power matters on the straights that is where the Red Bull drops back.

"If we do our homework well and set up the car perfectly, then it is possible I can make up some time to the others in the corners," Vettel said.

However, Ferrari's Fernando Alonso said nothing should be taken away from the W05 as a car.

"We know they have a power advantage," said the Spaniard. "But you only have to look at the gap to their customers' cars to see that the works team has a very good car."

Finally Vettel's new team-mate Daniel Ricciardo has been praised by the head of Red Bull's young driver program Dr Helmut Marko.

The Austrian, who famously had a very poor relationship with Ricciardo's predecessor Mark Webber, highlighted that rift by the way he expressed his delight at the Australian's start to life at the senior team.

"Finally we have an Australian who starts (races) well and can put Sebastian (Vettel) under pressure with fair methods," the always direct Marko is quoted by Germany's Auto Motor und Sport.

The 24-year-old too is happy with his performance but admitted points on the board, which have been somewhat stolen away from him in the opening races, would be better

"Obviously I'd love to have points," he is quoted by motorsport.com, "but most of all I'm very happy with what I've done behind the wheel.

"I have showed the team that they made a good choice."

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