Cycling

Lance Armstrong names doping accomplices

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Lance Armstrong has provided names of people who supplied him with, or had knowledge of his use of, performance-enhancing drugs during his career.

He has done so when compelled to answer questions under oath on 12 November last year in a lawsuit filed against him by Acceptance Insurance, who were looking to recover bonuses paid out to the disgraced cyclist for winning the Tour de France from 1999 to 2001.

Former US Postal team manager Johan Bruyneel is one of three people named by Armstrong. The Belgian is contesting the charges against him and is awaiting results of an arbitrary hearing into his role in what USADA called 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping program that sport has ever seen'.

The evidence given by Armstrong were obtained by USA Today when the cyclist's answers were filed as an exhibit as part of Floyd Landis's, federal whistleblower lawsuit against his former teammate.

Although the names mentioned by Armstrong will surprise no one, this is the first time he has publicly given them. In Armstrong's public televised confession to Oprah Winfrey in January 2013, he admitted to having used performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) but did go as far as to supply the names of others involved.

In the surfaced evidence Armstrong said trainer Pepi Marti, Dr Pedro Celaya, Dr Luis Garcia del Moral and Dr Michele Ferrari had all supplied him the PEDs.

Named among those who had delivered his drugs were masseuse and later whistleblower Emma O'Reilly, mechanic Julien de Vriese and Philippe Maire, known previously only as “Motoman”.

"Johan Bruyneel participated in or assisted with Armstrong's use of PEDs, and knew of that use through their conversations and acts," Armstrong said in the court document.

Along with Bruyneel, Celaya and Marti chose to take the USADA case against them to an arbitration hearing while Armstrong, Ferrari and del Moral did not contest the charges.

Armstrong said he generally paid for the substances himself but could not rule out that others had financially contributed. “There may have been additional persons, but Armstrong does not recall any others at this time," the document said.

Armstrong recalled using erythropoietin (EPO), the blood booster, as early as in the 1995 Tour de France but again denied cheating in his comeback tours in 2009 and 2010 as he did in the Oprah Winfrey interview.

Bruyneel told Belgian newspaper Het Nieuwsblad last summer that he was not the “devil” he was being portrayed as. “I can look everyone right in the eye. I have never endangered anyone’s health,” he said.

“I can’t go into detail because of the ongoing case. But I can tell you one thing: I am not a devil. The public may think that now, but in time everyone will get a better understanding of the situation. And then the picture will change.

“I can’t go into detail because of the ongoing case. But I can tell you one thing: I am not a devil. The public may think that now, but in time everyone will get a better understanding of the situation. And then the picture will change.

"According to the USADA report I was the mastermind behind the most sophisticated doping system ever, but that’s not true. I’m convinced of that.”

The International Cycling Union (UCI), cycling's governing body, has recently set up an independent commission (CIRC) who is charged with investigating doping within cycling, including the allegations of previous UCI administrations being complicit in covering up wrongdoings.

Armstrong has previously stated that he would cooperate and be willing to testify before such a commission but is not believed to have done so yet.

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Topics:
Lance Armstrong
Cycling

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This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

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