Cycling

Veteran cyclist lucky to survive crash

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Veteran cyclist Chris Horner admits he's lucky to be alive after he was hit by a car whilst training in Northern Italy.

Horner was apparently hit by a Range Rover last Friday in a tunnel in Lecco. The driver is said to be a 70-year-old man from Milan and claims he didn't realise he had hit the cyclist otherwise he wouldn't have just driven off.

The American suffered four broken ribs, a punctured lung, cuts to his head and bruises to his elbow. Horner will now miss the Giro d'Italia due to his injuries but hopes to be back in time for the Tour de France and the defence of his Vuelta a Espana title.

According to Cycling News, the Lampre-Merida rider said: "I'll be off the bike for a couple of weeks, then I'll ride the rollers and then I'll get back on the road.

"I won’t ride the Giro but perhaps I'll ride the Tour and then the Vuelta, to defend my title. But we've still got to decide everything.

"It's a real pity to miss the Giro d'Italia because I was starting to feel good and feel on form. I'd been studying the climbs and was going to ride the Giro del Trentino, which would have made me ready for the Giro."

Horner doesn't blame the driver of the car that hit him and claims he was lucky to make it out of the tunnel alive.

The 42 year old said: "I believe him, I want to believe him. It was just a moment of bad luck.

"I was training and went into a dark, narrow tunnel. But I don’t remember anything about the crash, I only remember when I came round, I was at the other end of the tunnel.

"If another car or a truck had gone through the tunnel when I crashed, I'd be dead. I was lucky. In a moment of bad luck, I was very lucky."

Horner is one of the oldest riders on the professional circuit at the moment but wants to continue racing until he feels like his body can't take anymore.

"Age is just a concept. 42 or almost 43 can mean you're old or mean you're still young. It's up to you, how you feel, your motivation, your dreams and desires. Look at Jens Voigt. He's full of strength, energy and enthusiasm and he's a month older than me.

"The important thing is keep riding and be up there with the best. If you can do it, your age is only a detail, a statistic. I don’t know what I'll do when I stop racing. I really want to race for another two or three years."

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Topics:
Cycling
Giro d'Italia
Tour De France

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This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

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