Formula 1

Canadian GP: A Guide to Circuit Gilles Villeneuve

Published Add your comment

Football News
24/7

After the tight and twisty challenge of Monte Carlo, F1 moves to Montreal and the high speed challenge of the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve for the Canadian Grand Prix.

Named after the 1970 world champion, the circuit is the first low downforce track of the year as top speed takes preference over grip in the corner. The track consists of 4 straights with a selection of slow chicanes and a hairpin.

This venue has hosted the Canadian race since 1970 and is well known for the unpredictable races it produces and much like Monaco, the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve offers one of the most unique settings for a race on the calendar.

Located on the Il de Notre Dame the surrounded by a river and the track very much has a street circuit feel with only a few areas having the kind of run off areas seen at other permanent circuits.

The track is 2.7 miles (4.3km) long with the race taking place over 70 laps and because the grounds are only used by cyclists for the rest of the year the circuit is one of the smoothest and therefore slipperiest venues in the sport.

Because of the extremely cold winters in Canada, the track surface has been known to break up, because of the savage grip of the F1 cars, this was particularly notably in 2008 when several corners had to be resurfaced on the morning of the race, however, since the return to slick tyres in 2009 there have been no such problems.

On the exit of the final chicane the wall is nicknamed the ' Wall of Champions' because in the late 90's many previous world champions crashed into the wall including Damon Hill, Jacques Villeneuve and Michael Schumacher.

The circuit is not a huge challenge for the drivers in terms of technical corners, however, by watching the on-board lap in the video above, you will see there are still some areas which are key to a perfect lap.

Along the main straight heading to turn one, the kink right just before the braking zone can make it easy to misjudge exactly where to brake for the tight first corner, many drivers often run wide onto the tarmac run-off area and rejoin after turn two, ruining any lap straight away.

The track then winds round through the downhill right, left chicane, where these 2014 cars with their higher torque, will make it is easy to lose the rear of the car and slide into the wall on the exit.

In previous years the straight between turn four and six has been just that as the kink of turn five has been easy flat, however, with the reduced downforce this year expect to see some drivers having to lift off through one of the narrowest parts of the circuit.

This leads to another chicane at turns six and seven. A slow left, right combination, the difficulty here is gaining a good exit because, during a race, many 'marbles' gather on the outside and it is easy to stray off-line on the exit and doing that would lead to a one way trip to the wall on the outside.

The chicane leads onto the first long straight as the cars build upto 190 mph (308kph) before another right, left chicane.

Turn eight is a tighter right though good traction through turn nine will be key as the next straight leads into a good overtaking area into the Casino hairpin.

This tight hairpin sees the cars brake from 180mph (290kph) down to just 50mph (75kph), many famous overtakes have happened here and this was also where Robert Kubica had his huge accident back in 2007.

A good exit is again key as it leads onto the longest straight on the circuit, this is where DRS will be located this year and will see the cars reach over 200mph (320kph) before a heavy braking zone into the final right, left chicane.

With its big kerbs this tricky chicane needs to be taken as quickly as possible as DRS is also used along the main straight but any error here results in becoming another victim of the 'Wall of Champions' on the outside.

In theory Canada should be one of the easier circuits on the calendar because of the lack of challenging turns and long straights, however, because of the proximity of the walls the mental challenge is among one of the highest on the calendar.

There is rarely a dull race in Montreal and with the Mercedes battle set to resume allied to the potential for close battles throughout the grid, it would be very difficult to see this year's race not producing another exciting spectacle.

Watch Sebastian Vettel dance around the high-speed track here!

Write for GiveMeSport! Sign-up to the GMS Writing Academy here: http://gms.to/1a2u3KU

DISCLAIMER: This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

Do YOU want to write for GiveMeSport? Get started today by signing-up and submitting an article HERE: http://gms.to/writeforgms

Topics:
Formula 1

Article Comments

Report author of article

Please let us know if you believe this article is in violation of our editorial policy, please only report articles for one of the following reasons.

Report author

DISCLAIMER

This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

Want more content like this?

Like our GiveMeSport Facebook Page and you will get this directly to you.

Already Subscribed to Facebook, don't ask me again

Follow GiveMeSport on Twitter and you will get this directly to you.

Already Following, don't ask me again

Like our GiveMeSport Page and you will get this directly to you.

Already Subscribed to G+, don't ask me again