Football

England are destined to never be as good as Brazil

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Since the inception of the FIFA World Cup back in 1930, the flamboyant nation of Brazil has dominated world football; winning five tournaments in the process. Their skilful, magnetising style of play has set them apart as the greatest footballing nation on earth.

An alumni of Brazilians have donned the bedroom walls of Brazilian children, with such players as Pelé, Zico, Garrincha, Ronaldo, Dunga, Cafu, Rivaldo and Ronaldinho just a few names on a conveyor belt of the nation's greats.

Looking at the list above, there is a certain breed of player that descends from Brazil - a tenacious, strong, passionate individual. Many Brazilian children first experience football playing in alleys, streets, favelas. They learn to play in treacherous conditions; adapting to surroundings - Pele began his footballing days playing with newspaper-stuffed socks.

All of these reasons link to why Brazil is the most successful World Cup nation. To come from kicking about a sock amongst mates in a favela to entertaining 70,000 Brazilians in the Maracana – the pride of donning the yellow shirt is entirely unique. Not only does that emitting colour reflect the culture of Brazil, but every thread represents the nation’s pride and faith in a sport which defines the country.

The combination of having a dogged, street footballer with exuding patriotism is something which sets Brazil out of reach from England. These street footballers, like Pele, learn their trade in conditions which don’t facilitate for football. And ironically, this makes them better players.

Once you’ve mastered playing with ever-changing, small-sized socks; playing with a perfectly round football is peanuts. Once you’ve mastered dribbling amongst lurking, sharp cans and uneven terrain; running with the ball becomes simple.

The difference in England is our culture and surroundings are too nice. From the early age of six I recall playing in the playground with a leather football, on cut grass. Once we’re good at that, there is no place to progress when playing for a club – you play with a leather football, on cut grass.

The majority of England has everything at its disposal. We can see England play at Wembley through forking out some pocket money; the only route some Brazilians have to seeing their national stadium is through playing on the hallowed turf itself.

Coming from nothing to something is what the daunting Brazilian culture provides, whereas in England we already have technology, shelter, food – there isn’t room for substantial progression from there. Consequently, wearing the Three Lions on your chest can’t be as significant.

As much as England invented the great sport of football, the culture and mentality of the nation of Brazil has truly taken the reins on pioneering it on a global scale. Brazil has reinvented the perception of how the beautiful game can be played many times in the past, and never has the famous saying “The English invented it, the Brazilians perfected it” felt so prominent.

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Topics:
World Cup
Brazil Football
England Football
Football

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This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

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