Athletics

Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson cleared to race

The athletes will now be able to compete in the national trials for the Commonwealth Games (©GettyImages)
The athletes will now be able to compete in the national trials for the Commonwealth Games (©GettyImages).

Jamaican sprinters Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson have both been cleared to compete, pending the outcome of their appeals.

Both Powell and Simpson were handed 18-month drug-bans after testing positive for the banned stimulant oxilofrine at the Jamaican Championships last June. The two have since appealed the decision, and the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) has agreed to review the appeals, meaning the athletes can race again, at least until the scheduled hearing on 7-8 July.

This means the pair can both compete in next week´s national trials ahead of the Commonwealth Games next month.

A statement from the CAS read: "The athletes are free to compete from now on but may have to serve the remaining part of their ban later if the sanction is eventually confirmed by CAS."

Powell, 31, won gold in the 100 metres at the Games in 2006, and would have a chance of qualifying at the trials, at least as part of the 4X100m relay team, probably containing Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake.

And he took to Twitter to share the good news: "God is good! Thank you to CAS for granting me this stay. I look forward to my day in Court," he tweeted. 

The Jamaican trials take place on the 26-29 June, before the Commonwealth Games begin on July 23. 

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Topics:
Yohan Blake
Usain Bolt
Athletics

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