Are Bayern Munich reverting back to their ill ways?

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Bayern Munich as a club are never far away from pandemonium and perceived chaos, and over the years they have been well known for it, hence their common nickname “FC Hollywood.”

Indeed, this highly deceiving name which seems to reflect the clubs modern day successes was in fact born out of a time when Bayern as a club were nearing self-implosion, and not challenging for a successive hat-trick of both international and domestic titles.

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The term was officially derived in the 1990’s after two decades of both on and off-field turmoil for Bayern which resulted in more sacking’s and gut - wrenching final defeats that you could potentially wave a stick at.

At one point in the 1990’s it seemed that managing Bayern would be harder than reaching the summit of Mount Everest blindfolded and without a synthetic insulated jacket, following the dismissal of five coaches in half a decade, with only one trophy to count for.

Indeed, the low point of two decades of financial turmoil, anguish, and bad publicity boiled down to 10th March 1998, a date which not only ensured the term “FC Hollywood” would be forever cast in stone, but a day which signalled that things had to change and fast.

In a fit of rage, and not afraid to speak his mind, Giovanni Trapatonni in his second spell as Bayern manager in a space of just three years in the mid 1990’s blasted in broken German: “These players were weak like a bottle empty, I have finished.”

Petulance widespread in the past

Indeed, the two players which this highly childish and embarrassing rant was directed at, Mehmet Scholl and Mario Basler formed the crux of a team who managed by Bayern legend, Ottmar Hitzfeld together went on to win eleven trophies in a highly successful period between 1998-2004.

Ten years down the line and it is self-explanatory to suggest that things have changed for the better at the club, and through a bitter-sweet cocktail of blood, sweat and tears, Bayern have managed to reinstate themselves as arguably the most powerful club in world football.

In the aftermath of Bayern winning the famous triple including the long-awaited fifth Champions League trophy which had eluded the club for 12 years, it was presumed that things could not get better even with the appointment of Pep Guardiola for the 2013-14 campaign.

Ambitions beyond the Bundesliga

In reality Bayern fans secretly hoped that they would see their club enter a period of world dominance which would eclipse what Barcelona achieved during the late 2000’s, but alas this has not been the case of yet and it is unlikely to happen.

Indeed, Guardiola inherited a team which was a work of art, carefully crafted and nurtured under the careful eye of Jupp Heycknes and for a moment in time it looked like an earth bound meteorite would be the only thing to stop the Red and White army from asserting their dominance.

A year later, and it is fair to say that the Bayern juggernaut has been well and truly halted, and once again the cause comes from the inside and not the outside.

It is fair to say that there was too much pressure resting on the shoulders of the highly successful 43-year-oldyear old manager who won all that there was to win in club football during his four year tenancy at Barcelona.

Jupp's legacy hard to match

He was expected to do the unthinkable in terms of becoming the first Bayern manager to repeat the triple, and for a certain amount of time it was thought that he was well on his way to accomplishing this after guiding the club to Super Cup and World Club Cup honours, six months into his tenure.

However, the task of ensuring that Bayern became the first club to successfully defend the Champions League was a step too far, and it is obvious to suggest that this pressure rubbed off on a number of his first team players, affecting their overall performances.

Towards the tail end of the previous campaign reports similar to that of the late 1990’s emerged when Toni Kroos and Thomas Muller expressed their anger and desire to leave a club which Guardiola was tarnishing with his egotistic style of tiki-taka football.

Hard to keep everyone happy

Whilst long-serving servants such as captain Philipp Lahm and Bastian Schweinsteiger stated that they were not sure whether Guardiola was indeed helping or hindering the club.

A few months later, with the Bundesliga and DFB Pokal in the bag and via a 5-0 thumping at the hands of Real Madrid in the Champions League final, “FC Hollywood” are very much back in business.

Never in Bayern’s wild’s dreams did they imagine the sheer amount of negative press surrounding the club, management and players, months after reaching the pinnacle of both domestic and international football.

Popular German newspapers such as Bild and Suddeutsche zeitungen have suggested that tensions are growing between Bayern players and both public and private falling-outs with Guardiola have become the norm as he tries to force his new players to implement his new playing style.

At times the 43-year-old manager has also publicly threatened to quit the club he joined a year ago if he was not able turn Bayern into a German version of the Barcelona he continues to admire.

Second season for Pep

Even today, after securing two pre-season trophies for Bayern and admitting that he is absolutely thrilled with his squad despite selling arguably his best creative midfielder in Toni Kroos, he subtlety keeps threatening to leave, and has even admitted that the job is out of his reach.

The Spaniard has even gone to the excuse of suggesting that the fact that six Bayern players would be returning the club as world champions would make his job harder as he would have to harness more inflated egos’.

Although Guardiola’s pathetic ploys at attention seeking it can be argued that the majority of media coverage directed at FC Hollywood has something to do with their disgraced former chairman, Uli Hoeness, who is currently serving three and a half years for tax evasion.

Both Bayern and the German media respectively know that the Bavarian giants are just not the shame without their highly passionate chairman cheering from the stands, whilst also financing big money moves.

Boardroom's missing man

His imprisonment is not only a touchy matter at the club, but it seems that everyone connected with Bayern are still very much shock up at the proceedings, and there have been rumours circulating that FC Hollywood have gone soft without their chairman being around.

Indeed, read as much into this as you will but it is interesting to suggest that Hoeness brought a sense of order and dominance to the club and without his input the Bavarian giants just don’t seem as big and scary any more.

Indeed, it will be interesting to see how the next campaign plans out for the Allianz Arena outfit, and it will be fascinating to see if they continue from where they left off last season, or imploding the same way they did during the 1990’s.

But rest-assured with a notable lack of summer signings and the increasing age of the current squad, combined with a manager who is on a death mission to turn Bayern into something which they are not, expect more negative than positive news in the upcoming months.

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