MLB

Mike Scioscia speaks about Josh Hamilton's struggles

Josh Hamilton, Angels Outfielder (©GettyImages)
Josh Hamilton, Angels Outfielder (©GettyImages).

The Los Angeles Angels have a handful of superstars and role players. A combination of stars and players, who in fact have helped the Angels get into position to make a playoff, give the team one of the best records in baseball.

In fact, they are a studded glory team that is flip flopping positions in the American League West with their rival, the Oakland A’s.

But Josh Hamilton, much to the dismay of himself and his manager Mike Scioscia, has contributed very little to the Angels efforts this season.

According to Gerry Fraley of the Dallas Morning News, Scioscia expressed on Saturday evening after the Angels win over the Rangers that Hamilton is ‘not the same player’ he used to be with the Rangers.

Scioscia has put Hamilton in the cleanup spot in the lineup for most of the season and doesn’t plan on moving him down the lineup, due to the value he brings to the team.

Little value

There isn’t much value coming out of Hamilton’s numbers this season, though with a batting average of .266, 8 home runs and 35 runs batted in 72 games.

Injuries, however, have plagued Hamilton’s true ability to increase the amount of production the Angels get on a gamely basis.

The struggling left fielder has a lot to ponder as to why his numbers haven't transfer from Texas but nothing can explain where his bat has gone coming to Anaheim.

His season last year wasn’t the typical season he would’ve had in Taxas, hitting an underachieving .250 with 21 homers and 79 RBIs in 151 games.

The power hitting lefty might need a break to clear his mind, which he did on Sunday. Hamilton took a day off on Sunday afternoon in the final game of the series against the Rangers to ‘clear his mind’ and think of a way to get back to his old hitting ways, according to Pedro Moura of the Orange County Register.

Time to regroup

It’d be a stretch to say Hamilton may need a week to recoup and get back on track.

With his talents turned back on, there’s no saying that it could or would define the outcome of the AL West and to a point, the American League playoff picture.

Hamilton signed five-year deal worth $125 million back in the winter of 2012 in the hope of winning a World Series title in an Angels uniform. Now in his second year of his contract, his decrease with the bat is becoming more noticeable and a concern.

A lot of things may factor into the clutch and highly touted power lumber woes. But what Hamilton believes in will eventually show in games at the end of August, going into September, and if all goes well for the Angels, in October.

Taking a day off (or some say a personal day for necessary reasons) is the first step in bringing back to the vintage Hamilton that manned the ship in the batting lineup. Scioscia doesn’t want to move out of the cleanup spot and to say that hasn’t gotten to him is an understatement.

If Hamilton plays against the Boston Red Sox on Monday (which is likely), we will see if Scioscia's words have been taken to heart.

Topics:
MLB
Los Angeles Angels

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