Edin Dzeko must drop nice guy act in order to be the best

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In a clash of two heavyweight strikers, it’s Diego Costa that offers more spark to his fight than a weaker, friendlier Edin Dzeko.

By signing Edin Dzeko in 2011, Manchester City bought a player that boosted the hopes of all City fans out there. It was clear the Bosnia International could play football with skill, but also with power. The reports coming out of Bundesliga was that City had signed one of the hottest prospects in world football, at the time.

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Weighing in at 80KG’s and standing at just over 6ft 4inches, Dzeko was clearly a player that had the capacity to bully the opposition off the pitch, a player that wouldn’t show any remorse when it came to out muscling any opposition player.

But it quickly came apparent that this wasn’t the case with Dzeko, that despite his fearsome stature and his rugged looking exterior, the inner softy seemed to come out far too often. Don’t get me wrong, Dzeko has impressed at times during his three years so far in England, showing glimpses of genius in a Mario Balotelli type of fashion, without the added drama.

But has the Bosnian international really been a hit in England, or has he just popped up with the odd ferocious strike now and then in order to assure City fans that their star striker is doing the job.

Dzeko has the ability, but also far too often doesn’t use his size in order to gain an advantage over the opposition. Rather than attempting to shoulder barge a defender away, he’d be quite happy to give the defender a foot race, accept defeat, and get on with a defensive duty of some sort.


Chelsea’s latest addition, Diego Costa, proves that sometimes you’ve got to be mean, even if your team are playing good football, a little bit of fight never hurt anyone, apart from the opposition. The Brazilian born Spanish International has set the Premier League alight this season with performances that reminisce a similar Chelsea player, Didier Drogba.

Costa, 26, has been in prolific form this season scoring 9 goals in 7 games, but it’s clear that he’s not just here for goals, but he’s here for a scrap. An argument breaks out on the pitch, Dzeko has taken out a player by accident, gets up and apologises. The same argument breaks out with Costa, the Spanish international gets up, ignores the player, and puts that anger into beating the opposition.


Physically he compares with Dzeko, weighing in at 1KG more, but being 2inches less in height. But it’s not just physical, but mental. Costa applies this strength in a bullying type fashion, he gets in the heads of defenders and makes them scramble when he’s on the ball, something that the average football fan couldn’t say about Dzeko.

It’s clear the skill is their for both players, it’s clear the physique is there for both players, but until Dzeko focuses his anger, there will always be that “what if” question lingering over his head.

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Diego Costa
Edin Dzeko
Manchester City

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