Football

Sporting Lisbon launch complaint towards UEFA

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Sporting Lisbon have issued a complaint to UEFA following the controversial penalty awarded to FC Schalke 04 which ultimately decided the game.

The new Royal Blues boss, Roberto Di Matteo was making his Champions League return after previously winning the competition with Chelsea however his homecoming was overshadowed by a refereeing decision which resulted in a match winning penalty.

It was initially believed that Lisbon defender, Jonathan Silva had caught the ball with his arm in the penalty area but replays have shown that the ball actually hit Silva’s head. (1 minute 53)

Since this incident has arisen, Schalke have put together a statement which reads:

"The 4-3 home win in the Champions League is being disputed by Sporting CP.

"Last season’s runners-up in the Portuguese top flight aren’t happy with the result on Tuesday night (October 21st) and have therefore lodged a protest to Uefa.

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"Sporting CP have requested to the European football association that the game be replayed and have alternatively requested payment of the premium for a draw."

Match events

Striker, Eric Maxim Choupo-Moting netted the winning penalty but on the balance of play, both sides deserved a draw.

Lisbon initially took the lead through on-loan Manchester United winger, Nani but Schalke then raced into a 3-1 lead thanks to goals from Obasi, Huntelaar and Howedes.

The Portuguese side then got back into the game thanks to two goals from Perruchet Silva – one of which was a penalty.

Lisbon are desperately disappointed with the decision and they are trying to persuade UEFA officials to bring television replays into the game.

Like other sports, Lisbon have requested that the fourth official gets the right to look at a television replay to determine decisions.

Technology in football

Football has fallen behind other sports in regard to advancements in technology.

Rugby League has embraced the use of technology and because of this there are less controversial decisions.

Replays are used to determine trys and the referees are equipped with microphones and cameras thus allowing any disputes involving players and officials to be judged after the game.

This therefore gives the referees more authority and they tend to be more respected that referees in football.

Last weekend in the Premier League, managers targeted the officials after games to question their perception.

Crystal Palace manager, Neil Warnock is now facing charges from the FA following comments he made about the referee being influenced by Chelsea players in their 2-1 defeat.

Swansea manager, Gary Monk also spoke out regarding a penalty decision but his comments have not been addressed.

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Topics:
UEFA Champions League
Luis Nani
European News
Football

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