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Sepp Blatter resigns, but is he the cause or just part of the cancer at FIFA?

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Sepp Blatter resigns, and the football community is cheering and looking towards a positive future, well the FA and UEFA are anyway. Hang on though, what about all of those in football that just voted for Mr Blatter, are they cheering today? I very much doubt it!

And let us not forget he hasn't actually gone yet....

Even now after Sepp Blatter has resigned he is still part of the organisation. Based on the honourable rules implemented by FIFA, there now needs to be a new election process, and he is remaining as president until that happens.

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No doubt he will in his time left be using his political influence to guide his supporters to appointing his successor based on his own recommendations. And to elect a new president, it has to go to a vote of all of those really honest and honourable FIFA representatives, who have happily been voting for Mr Blatter and a culture of corruption and bribery for the last 20 years. 

He has now been named as a person of interest in the FBI investigation into corruption, does that mean he will be facing arrest and possible prosecution in the weeks or months to come? And would that then encourage him to make his resignation immediate or for FIFA to actually demand it?

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We are all now considering whether the head of the snake has been removed, and the culture at FIFA can be changed. 

But was Blatter actually the cause of the cancer and people followed his example, or is the problem actually, that the people currently involved in football around the world in emerging nations such as Africa, South America the Middle East aren't really interested in improving football?

And that they are mainly, as surely not everyone can be, can they? A fundamentally corrupt group of individuals, that are only looking to line their own pockets? On a global political landscape some of these regions are well known for other forms of corruption, as well as those involved in football.

Will it take the removal of all of the current FIFA representatives and most of those working for them, and a completely new vetting and appointment process, to remove all of the corrupt figures from world football?

The US and Swiss indictments have singled out a relatively small number of senior figures, but will that be enough? Surely others around them were aware of their activities and either helped cover them up or chose to turn a blind eye? Yes the senior figures undoubtedly will be the ones who have benefited the most from the brides, but those who worked with them will have certainly seen their rewards for silence.

Will it take hundred of arrests around the world to actually punish those involved and change FIFA?

FIFA is shrouded in secrecy from the salaries paid, to the misuse of the multi million pound expense accounts. Which in any normal organisation, would have been enough to instigate serious legal proceedings against individuals involved.

And even though lots of other organisations have been found to abuse these arrangements in the past, just look at the UK governments MPs expenses scandal as an example, it was nowhere near on the same scale. I don't remember any MPs awarding themselves $20,000 Rolex watches in the news.

Can FIFA ever really become a transparent organisation under its current structure, with the current individuals involved?

Let's look at FIFA's own internal compliance and ethics committee, they have ignored the huge amounts of corruption over the last 20 years, can they really be trusted to police themselves moving forward? Or are they as culpable due to their failings to route out the corruption, and just a further part of the cancer?

The head of FIFA compliance Domenico Scala, a supposed independent chairman, is not the one leading the charge to the authorities with requests for legal indictments as far as we know. It has all come from outside agencies such as the FBI, to take a stand and route out the criminality across world football.

Yes Sepp Blatter resigning is a good thing, but it is far from all that is needed to reform the way that FIFA operates, for 30 years it has been corrupt, will it take another 30 to repair its reputation?

An article on Bloomberg News this week asked an interesting question regarding whether the whole structure of FIFA needs to change, going from a non profit private organisation to a PLC. A PLC has to have a board who are responsible to the share holders, who want complete transparency in the way the company pays salaries, and uses and invests its money.

It is a debate that is not unusual across football, supporters trusts argue that the supporters should be owners of the clubs, and have a say in the way they are run, is that the answer for FIFA?

Now this is highly unlikely, and a drastic approach, but is that what it will take to actually remove the culture of corruption from the most popular sport in the world?

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