Vince Carter.

GiveMeSport's writers pick their favourite NBA All-Star moments

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Toronto's hosting of the 2016 NBA All-Star weekend is already well underway and, judging by what the celebs and rising stars had to offer on Friday night, this year's event is sure to provide basketball fans will plenty of lasting memories.

The NBA's annual midseason get-together is always jam-packed with big names, must-see plays and moments that transcend the sport.

With that in mind, GiveMeSport's NBA writers sat down to reminisce about their favourite All-Star moments of years gone by...

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Kyle Hancox:

The All-Star weekend is always a spectacle within itself as the biggest names in the basketball world congregate in one city. But, for me, 2010 - in Dallas - took All-Star to another level, thanks to the help of Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban.

Kobe Bryant may have been missing from the annual spectacle and the game itself was not the most memorable of all-time, despite Dwight Howard sinking a three-pointer early on, but the sheer size of the arena is what makes 2010 stand out.

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The previous record attendance for an All-Star game was the Houston Astrodome back in 1989 when 44,735 were in attendance. More than double were in the Cowboys Stadium as 108,713 people took All-Star to another level.

Dwayne Wade (top) of the Eastern Confere

The buzz of excitement and the energy inside the arena was crazy and Steve Nash described it as being on 'Battlestar Galactica'. It just goes to show that if the arena size is there, then the passionate NBA fans will flock in their droves to watch their favourite players.

It was a real moment in my following of the league where I realised the power this sport had and it only made my passion for the game grow seeing those thousands of people inside the arena.

Alastair Davidson

Disclaimer: I didn't actually watch this moment live, but I (alongside surely every other NBA fan) have watched it at least 1,000 times since.

Vince Carter's masterclass in the 2000 All-Star Dunk Contest set a new gold standard for the event and sent a whole new generation of kids out onto the street (and possibly then to A&E) to try and recreate his gravity-defying moves.

Carter took over the event from start to finish, unveiling five dunks worthy of winning any competition that had gone before him.

The thing that makes it even better? The fact the Raptors star had apparently scrapped his original plans on arrival in Oakland, meaning the whole thing was essentially improvised.

There are two ways you know this is a genuine All-Star moment for the ages. First, show anyone the video montage - even a non-basketball fan - and you can guarantee they will be in awe. Second, watch every dunk contest since, and you're guaranteed to hear Carter's name mentioned, at least, a dozen times.

If the All-Star game is about having fun and creating memories, then Vince Carter in the year 2000 fits the bill perfectly.

Alex Johnson

The All-Star Weekend is all about fun and no one defined having fun in the NBA quite like Shaquille O'Neal.

In an age when sport became far too rigid and business-like for its own good, Shaq seemed to make it his mission to be an entertainer. He took that to extremes when it came to the All-Star Game, creating a moment for the ages in 2009 with his player entrance.

O'Neal teamed up with "The Jabbawockeez", a hip-hop dance crew, to pop and lock his way onto the court and into All-Star history. Complete with the crew's trademark white mask, Shaq was incredible and more than managed to keep up with the pro dancers.

Standing at over seven feet tall and tipping the scales at 325lbs, there is no Godly reason for him to be able to dance so well. The way 'The Big Shaqtus' can move his feet defies physics and any scientific reasoning.

This wasn't the first time O'Neal danced during an All-Star contest - he showed us a glimpse in a 2006 dance-off with LeBron James and Dwight Howard - but the quality of the dance and it's overall hilarity definitely made it one of the best All-Star moments of all-time.

Conor Porter

The best All-Star games are when we get to see a basketball legend play at the event for one final time. This year, it will be Kobe Bryant’s turn. Back in 2003, it was Michael Jordan making his last hurrah.

This was the G.O.A.T's last All-Star game before he retired, but it didn’t end with a victory Jordan. The West was defeated by the East 155-145 in what was a very close contest that went to double overtime.

Allen Iverson led the East with 35 points, but it was the West’s Kevin Garnett who was the game's MVP after scoring 37 points.

The Chicago Bulls legend scored 20 points in this game for the East, and he made a typically clutch basket near the end of the first period of overtime.

Jordan passes

Hopefully, Bryant will have the same kind of impact in the final All-Star game of his career this weekend. We wouldn't mind double overtime, either!

This was also Yao Ming’s All-Star debut, and he was the first rookie since to start in an All-Star Game since Grant Hill in 1995.


Of course, these four snapshots are just scratching the surface of a game that, over the years, has provided fans with countless memorable moments.

Let us know your personal favourites in the comments below, and check back tomorrow for an in-depth look at another - Magic Johnson's emotional final All-Star game in 1992.

GiveMeSport readers can get a 20% discount on All-Star merchandise at NBA Store EU by clicking here

Eastern Conference
Michael Jordan
Western Conference

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This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

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