NBA

.

Three NBA careers that were unfortunately cut short

Published Add your comment

Chris Bosh's comeback trail was put on hold today after a statement from the Miami Heat confirmed he had failed a medical examination and would not return in time for training camp.

The forward has not played since before the 2016 All-Star break due to a blood clot - the second time in as many years his season has been cut short by the issue - and the future looks pretty bleak.

There is a real possibility that the 11-time All-Star could be forced into an early retirement. He would not be the first player who called time on his career early, here are three other examples.

Yao Ming

He may have been inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame this year but Yao Ming could have offered so much more to the Houston Rockets and the NBA.

He played nine seasons for the Western Conference franchise, making the most of his 7'6 frame as he was selected to eight All-Star teams and was in five separate All-NBA teams, but he managed just five appearances in his final campaign for the organisation.

Ming retired due to injuries of his foot and ankles, but he still left a huge imprint on the NBA, in the USA and his home nation.

Houston Rockets v Los Angeles Lakers

Pete Maravich

One of the best ball handlers to ever play the game of basketball saw his career cut short after a series of injuries that included problems with both knees.

After four years in Atlanta then five in New Orleans, he landed in Salt Lake City but was waived by the Utah Jazz due to then coach Tom Nissalke's strict rules on players being unable to train - Pistol Pete's injuries had become so bad he never hit the practice court.

He joined Larry Bird and the Boston Celtics and played a supporting role with the Eastern Conference organisation. Realising that his knee problems were never going to disappear, the five-time All-Star opted to call time on his playing career.

Magic Johnson

He may have been 32 when he was diagnosed with HIV but Magic Johnson was still at the peak of his powers up until that point.

Johnson had just come off a 19.4 points, 12.5 assists per game season with the L.A. Lakers and had won the MVP award in 1990 before he immediately retired from the game due to his illness.

He may have played in the 1992 Olympics and made a less than successful return in 1996 with L.A., but there was so much of Magic we missed.

Earvin (Magic) Johnson

Topics:
NBA
Western Conference
Central Division
Eastern Conference
Houston Rockets
Southwest Division
LA Lakers
Pacific Division
Atlanta Hawks
Southeast Division

Article Comments

Report author of article

Please let us know if you believe this article is in violation of our editorial policy, please only report articles for one of the following reasons.

Report author

DISCLAIMER

This article has been written by a member of the GiveMeSport Writing Academy and does not represent the views of GiveMeSport.com or SportsNewMedia. The views and opinions expressed are solely that of the author credited at the top of this article. GiveMeSport.com and SportsNewMedia do not take any responsibility for the content of its contributors.

Want more content like this?

Like our GiveMeSport Facebook Page and you will get this directly to you.

Already Subscribed to Facebook, don't ask me again

Follow GiveMeSport on Twitter and you will get this directly to you.

Already Following, don't ask me again

Like our GiveMeSport - NBA Page and you will get this directly to you.

Already Subscribed to G+, don't ask me again