British boxer Tyson Fury.

Tyson Fury fails second drug test for cocaine

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Having failed a drug test only last month for a class A substance, Tyson Fury has tested positive yet again.

The tests were carried out on September 21 and September 22 respectively, both samples testing positive for benzoylecgonine.

Shortly before pulling out of his championship match against Wladimir Klitschko after being declared medically unfit to fight, it was revealed the British boxer tested positive for cocaine for the first time.

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Both tests were carried out by the Voluntary Anti-Doping Association (VADA).

The second failed test emerged after Fury himself admitted to having used considerable amounts of cocaine in a recent interview with the Rolling Stone magazine.

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A report sent by VADA president, Dr. Margaret Goodman, to Fury and everyone involved in the match contained a letter confirming the results.

As per The Mirror, it read: "This letter is to advise you that the 'A' sample urine specimen number 4006217 collected from Tyson Fury on September 21, 2016, through his participation in the Voluntary Anti-Doping Association (VADA) program has been analyzed for anabolic agents, diuretics, beta-2 agonists, stimulants and drugs of abuse."

"The results of the analyses are as follows: Adverse. Urine sample contains benzoylecgonine."

Tyson Fury & Wladimir Klitschko Head to Head Press Conference

The British Boxing Board of Control (BBBC) has stated that Fury's fate in the sport will be decided next week, with the possibility of stripping the 28-year-old of his boxing license, which would likely result in him also losing the WBO and WBA world heavyweight titles.

"The meeting won't be for Tyson Fury alone. We have a meeting on October 12. All of Mr Fury's recent issues will be discussed at that point, after which we'll see what we're going to do."

BBBC added: "He is licensed by us. The sanctioning bodies, the WBO, WBA - they are not governing bodies - they can strip him, declare titles vacant, or he can vacate them."

"We deal with the license, so in theory, if we were to suspend him, they would have no choice but to strip him because he can't defend them, can he?"


Fury was recently diagnosed with a severe case of depression and the boxer has confessed to using cocaine in order to battle his mental health issues.

His bizarre activity on social media to announce his retirement before immediately retracting the statement earlier this week has shed some serious light on his vulnerable mental condition, for which he is reportedly receiving treatment.

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David Haye
Wladamir Klitschko
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