Athletics

Fraser-Pryce delivered one of the fastest times of her career to win in Lausanne..

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce on motherhood, victory in Lausanne and Dina Asher-Smith

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There's not a thesaurus big enough to give us the words for Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce right now.

Having eased her way out of athletics for the birth of her son in 2017, the Jamaican could have hung up her spikes and her achievements would still have been discussed for decades.

To call her the 'Female Bolt' is a disservice to her own individuality as a star athlete, but the medal comparisons across the Olympics and World Championships are certainly there.

However, even with a trophy cabinet so large it probably needs a mortgage, Fraser-Pryce has returned to the sport and is officially the fastest mother in the world.

Having already shocked the athletics world - in the best possible way - with a 10.73-second 100 metres at the Jamaican trials, the 32-year-old then set her sights on the Diamond League.

Fraser-Pryce shines in Lausanne

GiveMeSport were live in Lausanne to see her share the track with Dina Asher-Smith but, in truth, there was only one winner and Fraser-Pryce was simply in a league of her own.

Deploying her typically explosive start and maintaining form well, the Olympian blew away a competitive field and cruised through the line with an electrifying time of 10.74 seconds.

That's faster than the time she ran in the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympic finals and all after taking a break from the sport to give birth to her son. Incredible stuff.

Speaking with GiveMeSport after her victory, Fraser-Pryce explained that motherhood has given her an extra fire in the belly, remarking: "It's given me a lot of motivation coming back!

"A lot of people tend to believe that having a baby somehow ends your career, well having a baby has started mine! So, I'm just happy with the gold!"

Even so, Fraser-Pryce was surprised to see 10.74 illuminate the Omega clock and it was an inspired performance after the disappointment of Stanford the week before.

Post-Prefontaine improvements

"I was a little surprised!" the Jamaican admitted to us. "I went to Prefontaine and I travelled to Italy the next day, then flew here on Wednesday, so I was feeling like: 'oh, maybe it's not going to go so well!'

"But thank God that it turned out good. It goes to show that mentally you have to be prepared for any situation and I'm glad that today I was able to show up." 

On this occasion, Asher-Smith was left grasping for the coat-tails of her legendary rival, but it's hard to complain when a season's best came in tandem with the silver medal. 

ATHLETICS-SUI-IAAF-DIAMOND

The Brit has been unlucky to suffer two defeats over 100 metres this season, having also come up short against a rejuvenated Elaine Thompson in Rome.

Nevertheless, she certainly left an impression on Fraser-Pryce, who had nothing but positive things to say about the British-record holder and her influence on women's sport.

Competing against Dina Asher-Smith

The Lausanne winner explained: "When I saw her winning the 22.1 seconds earlier in the season, I was like: 'Yo, female sprinting was definitely going to be lit this year!'

"I'm really happy because when you have female athletes coming and rising to the occasion, it makes for a better competition and you want to have those people competing because it means you have to raise your game.

"So, I'm really happy that Asher-Smith has been able to bring those times and I'm really looking forward to the competition she brings."

It's not until the World Championships that 2019 performances will be truly held to account, but Fraser-Pryce has already made her presence known on the comeback trail.

The Jamaican has managed to improve on her times from 2016, despite ageing three years and becoming a mother in the mean time - if that's not inspiring stuff, we don't know what is.

Who do you think will win the women's 100m in Doha? Have your say in the comments section below.

Topics:
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
Commonwealth Games
Women's Sport
Athletics

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