Noah Lyles reacts to Christian Coleman-USADA case before the Diamond League final

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There's a Christian Coleman-sized shadow hanging over athletics right now.

The American sprinter, who is the fastest man in the world this year, made headlines across the world after USADA launched a case against him for allegedly missing three doping tests.

The case was later dropped on what appeared to be a technicality and while that clears Coleman's name in the process, there will still be fans and athletes that look at him differently from now on.

It's only understandable that a sport so saddled by doping scandals would - as if haemophilic - bleed heavily at the slightest sign of a cut. 

Coleman wasn't present for the Diamond League's 100-metre final in Zurich last week, but the victor on that night - Noah Lyles - was inevitability quizzed about his competitor in the aftermath.

Lyles quizzed on Coleman case

Speaking at the international press conference for the Brussels Diamond League, in which he will contest the 200 metres, Lyles was understandably evasive when Coleman was name-dropped.

Greeting the question with a shrug of the shoulder, Lyles simply replied: "I'm glad to see him running again. I don't wish ill upon anybody. It's already decided, it doesn't matter what I think."

However, the conversation later evolved into the USADA process in general and just how difficult it really is or isn't to miss such crucial doping tests.

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Lyles' USADA app mishap 

The answer? It's certainly easy to miss one and a typically energetic Lyles explained how he once wrongly ogranised a test because he accidentally entered 'AM' as opposed to 'PM' into the app.

Lyles amusingly recalled: "I was expecting them in the morning the whole time! The quarter was accidentally set to PM and I went out with my friends to dinner, to come home and see an email saying: 'You missed a test.'

"I was like: 'Hold up, what? No I didn't? Oh, maybe it's time to get harder up on that.' But me and my mom learnt everything there was and the scariest thing in mind was that if I missed three, I would be gone for a whole year.

"I obviously didn't want that. So, me and my mom are constantly on the app, which can get a little hard to use at times because it's not as updated as the website.

"When I'm in Europe, I usually get my mom to put in all the whereabouts. I'll call her and give to her the whereabout as soon as possible. The sooner you do it, the less you have to worry about it."

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Norman reacts to Van Niekerk news

Also present in the Belgian capital was Michael Norman, who will enter the 400-metre final as the favourite with his world-leading time of 43.45 seconds.

However, the athletics world was met with the sad news that Wayde van Niekerk won't be defending his title over one lap at the World Championships in Doha.

Norman, as Van Niekerk's heir apparent, expressed his sadness at the world-record holder missing out, but believes it's the correct decision for his long-term future in the sport. 

"It's disappointing to see the world's best 400m runner not being able to defend his title," the world-leader admitted. "We're all competitors and we want to compete against the best of the best.

"I'm hoping that he's going to come around next year and be at his best, because I would love to race him when he's at his best. I think it's a smart decision for him to take this extra time to recover.

16th IAAF World Athletics Championships London 2017 - Day Five

Brussels and Doha approach

On the eve of the IAAF's lead-support for the World Championships, it was a reminder that - even if you take Coleman out of the equation - there are already two superb American sprinters on the scene.

But don't be surprised if the reprieved Coleman can solidify his status as the world's fastest man in Doha, potentially with Lyles and Norman similarly succeeding for an American sprinting lock-out. 

Set the start and finish line anywhere between the confines of a single lap and there's every reason to suggest the winner would be wearing a star-spangled banner every time. 

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