Tokyo Olympics: 'Anti-sex' beds introduced for athletes

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Athletes from across the globe are currently gearing up for the start of the Tokyo Olympics, but even though the Games are set to begin on Friday, COVID-19 concerns continue to dominate the headlines.

The International Olympic Committee announced last month that the Games would take place behind closed doors for the first time in their history because of a surge of COVID-19 cases in Tokyo.

Earlier this week, Team GB taekwondo fighter and bronze medallist at the 2016 Rio Games Bianca Walkden told the Guardian: “We’ve all got paranoia around covid. It is just to make sure we are all being safe. Our masks are on all the time no matter what, everyone is doing every single safety precaution.”

But another safety precaution has begun making headlines over the past couple of days, after it was revealed that the athletes' dorms at the Olympic village come equipped with 'anti-sex' beds.

As American track and field athlete and 2016 5,000 metre Olympic silver medallist Paul Chelimo pointed out on Twitter, the beds are made of cardboard and are able to “withstand the weight of a single person to avoid situations beyond sports.”

Read more: Tokyo Olympics 2021: Latest News, Dates, Results, Sports And Everything You Need To Know

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According to The Daily Star, the beds are made out of cardboard and, with a max weight of 200kg, are designed to only be able to withstand the weight of one person. They will also supposedly break if any sudden movements occur, although on the plus side, they can conveniently be recycled when the Games come to an end.

The news came after athletes were warned to avoid close contact with others and to avoid using the free, branded condoms that are given out as an Olympic tradition during the Games. This particular tradition has been in effect since 1988 and is to encourage safe sex amongst the athletes while they live in a closely confined space for weeks.

The organisers of the Games say that athletes should take the condoms home, though, in an attempt to raise awareness for HIV and Aids.

Earlier today, two South Africa footballers became the first competitors to test positive for coronavirus just five days before the start of the Olympic Games. According to the BBC, South Africa's Football Association confirmed Thabiso Monyane and Kamohelo Mahlatsi as the cases.

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The incident occurred after a Games-related organiser became the first person to test positive for COVID-19 in the athletes' village on Saturday.

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