Tokyo Olympics: 'Anti-sex' beds debunked by athlete

  • Kim Loe
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Irish artistic gymnast Rhys McClenaghan took time out from his balance beam and pommel horse to do a very different kind of Olympic warm-up with some energetic bed bouncing and mattress manoeuvres.

Audacious claims were circling that athletes in Tokyo’s Olympic village would be sleeping on purposely designed ‘anti-sex’ beds in a bid to stop any saucy sports between the bed sheets taking place between the male and female athletes.

Made totally from cardboard, it was being claimed that beds in the Olympic dorms would be able to hold a maximum bodyweight of 200kg, but would quickly collapse should any athletes try to get intimate and use them for late-night love-making.

Due to the difficult social circumstances in Japan, with COVID-19 cases rising and a number of well-attended protests against the Games, organisers are bringing in strict and stern social distancing rules.

Olympians and support staff are being told to avoid all close contact and intimacy and they’ve even introduced a range of penalties and fines for those who flaunt the rules.

Read more: Tokyo Olympics 2021: Latest News, Dates, Results, Sports And Everything You Need To Know

While many are in strong support for sensible social distancing and preventing the spread of COVID-19, making Olympians sleep on the anti-bonking beds seemed to be taking things a bit far.

“In today’s episode of fake news…”

McClenaghan was quick to put rumours to bed, energetically bouncing on his dorm bunk and disproving all the absurd ‘anti-sex’ claims. The 21-year-old medal-hopeful from Newtownards, Northern Ireland was quick to call it out as ‘fake news!’

While he admitted the beds were made out of cardboard, he discredited the growing gossip that the beds would collapse under any sudden movement.

Rather than stop sex, the 18,000 Olympic beds are made from environmentally friendly cardboard frames and polyethylene mattresses, which will be re-used to create cardboard and plastic products once the Games are over.

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