Sha'Carri Richardson: Sprinter posts defiant message after finishing last in 100m

Sha’Carri Richardson posted a defiant message on social media after finishing last at the Diamond League meeting in Eugene

American sprinter Sha’Carri Richardson posted a defiant message after finishing last in the women's 100m race at the Diamond League meeting in Eugene.

Richardson finished ninth at the Prefontaine Classic, crossing the line in a disappointing time of 11.14 seconds. She then withdrew from the 200m.

Despite the result, Richardson did not seem too despondent by her performance. In an interview with NBC’s Lewis Johnson, she described the race as "a great return back to the sport".

"This is one race," she said. "I’m not done. You know what I’m capable of. Count me out if you want to. Talk all the shit you want. Because I’m here to stay. I’m not done. I’m the sixth fastest woman in this game ever and can’t nobody ever take that from me.

"I wanted to be able to come and perform after having a month off and dealing with all I was dealing with. I’m not upset with myself at all."

Richardson has now followed up on her comments with a defiant message on social media, posting: "Only way from 9th is up!" The post was accompanied by several praying emojis.

Fans have offered support to Richardson, with Twitter user replying: "Don't mind the haters. You will be at the top in no time. Keep working champ."

Richardson returned to the track in Eugene after serving a one-month ban for a failed drugs test. The 21-year-old tested positive for a chemical found in marijuana after her victory in the 100m at the US Olympic trials in June.

She was subsequently ruled out of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, despite revealing she had taken the drug to cope with the recent death of her biological mother.

Sha’Carri Richardson posted a defiant message on social media after finishing last at the Diamond League meeting in Eugene

Richardson only turned professional in 2019, but soon set the sprinting world alight. She ran a personal best of 10.72 in April, making her the sixth fastest woman in history. The young star would have gone into the Olympic 100m as a serious medal contender.

Elaine Thompson-Herah took gold instead, going on to become the first woman to retain Olympic titles in the 100m and 200m. She ran even faster at the Prefontaine Classic, clocking the second fastest women’s 100m time ever after in 10.54.

Florence Griffith-Joyner of the United States is the only woman to have recorded a faster time over the distance, having set the world record of 10.49 seconds in 1988.

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